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Porcelain refinishing -Reply



Michelle 

I think the processes for refinishing fiberglass fixtures and refinishing
porcelain fixtures may be very similar.  (For a step-by-step process
tour, see:                     
http://www.dreammaker-remodel.com/index.html    )

I learned a little about fiberglass fixture refinishing a few years ago
when a co-worker had the very unfortunate experience of having
someone, who did not properly containing the overspray, refinish a
bathtub in her house .  Overspray deposited itself all over her house
on floors, walls, furniture, and brand new kitchen cabinets.

At the time there was a very informative web site for the North
American Refinishers Association.  I found a link by searching for
them on YAHOO today, but it was a dead end - my computer could
not find them on the server noted in their URL.  They were located
in (Southern?) California.  Their website had lots of information
about good work practice - mostly focused on producing a quality
result.  There may have been some worker safety and
environmental information too.

Another informative web sites is Integrity Refinishing Coatings at       
             http://www.integritycoatings.com/

Are they using acetone as a substitute for some VOC?





Dave Salman
Coatings and Consumer Products Group
US EPA OAQPS (Mail Drop 13)
RTP NC 27711
tel (919) 541-0859
fax (919) 541-5689
e-mail salman.dave@epa.gov

>>> Catherine Dickerson <cdickerson@pprc.org> 02/25/00
12:54pm >>>
Kind of an unusual question:

any experience with p2 for bathtub/sink/etc. refinishing?

Supposedly the spray process is pretty efficient - done from 6" away
and dries almost instantly.  They do use acetone for thinning and
cleaning.  

The only ideas I can think to explore are:

* possibly use paint heater to increase viscosity - instead of acetone
thinners
* alternatives to acetone
* spray efficiency
* less toxic coating (e.g. no isocyanates in coating)
* 'solvent saver' - device that uses mix of solvent and compressed
air to clean equipment and lines - can cut solvent by 50%

Any other leads would be appreciated.  

Regards,

Michelle Gaither, PPRC
(sharing e-mail w/ Kate Dickerson)