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GLIN==> Two Seminar Announcements (Ann Arbor)



NOAA Great Lakes Seminar Series Seminar Announcements
(Posted by David Reid, GLERL)

Date:  Tuesday, December 4, 2001

TITLE: "ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION OF LAKE OKEECHOBEE, FLORIDA"

SPEAKER: Dr. Alan Steinman
Director, Annis Water Resources Institute, Lake Michigan Center, Grand Valley State University.

TIME: 1:00 p.m.

WHERE: GLERL Main Conference Room

ABSTRACT: Lake Okeechobee (Florida) is the second largest freshwater lake in the coterminous United States (after Lake Michigan). It is impacted primarily by three environmental problems: cultural eutrophication, altered hydrology, and invasive species. A major restoration program, consisting of experimental research, modeling, planning, construction, and regulatory activities, was initiated in the late 1990s and is expected to last for several decades. This talk provides an overview of these problems and the proposed restoration activities, highlights a case study revealing the political difficulties of integrating science and environmental management, and shows an example of how an episodic event (Hurricane Irene) strongly influences the dynamics of this large, shallow subtropical lake.

CONTACT: Dr. David Reid, NOAA/GLERL, 734-741-2019

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Date:  Wednesday, December 5, 2001

TITLE: "GENETIC INVESTIGATIONS OF NONINDIGENOUS SPECIES INVASIONS IN THE GREAT LAKES: ORIGINS, GENETIC DIVERSITY, AND SPREAD PATTERNS OF DREISSENID MUSSELS, GOBIES, AND THE RUFFE"

SPEAKER: Dr. Carol Stepien (Sea Grant scientist)
Director, Great Lakes Environmental Genetics Laboratory, Center for Environmental Science, Technology and Policy, Cleveland State University.

TIME: 2:00 p.m.

WHERE: GLERL Main Conference Room

ABSTRACT: Population genetic relationships for three nonindigenous species invasions in the Great Lakes are analyzed from nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequence data for zebra and quagga mussels, round and tubenose gobies, and the Eurasian ruffe. Comparisons are made across their respective native and introduced ranges. Results indicate that zebra mussels appear to have been introduced from multiple sites in central and western Europe, but not eastern Europe; quagga mussels in North America are divergent from samples in their native Ukraine; introduced populations of round gobies in North America and Gulf of Gdansk had different founding sources and neither are related to the northern Black Sea; and the ruffe invasion in North America originated from a single source that matches the Elbe River.

CONTACT: Dr. Rochelle Sturtevant, NOAA/GLERL, 734-741-2287

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For directions to GLERL:
    http://www.glerl.noaa.gov/facil/triptik.html

Check the NOAA Great Lakes Seminar Series Web Page for information about future seminars:
http://www.glerl.noaa.gov/news/seminars/
 
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